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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 2015
 
Thursday Evening Program: The Weyerhaeusers and Mussers
In the Music Room at the Muscatine Art Center
Thursday, November 5, 2015 from 5:30-6:30 p.m.
FREE ADMISSION
 
Historian Tom Rasmussen and author Judith Healy will present “The Weyerhaeusers and the Mussers,” explaining the important relationship between Peter Musser and Frederick Weyerhaeuser both as partners in the lumber business and good friends. The program, held on Thursday, November 5th at 5:30 p.m. in the Art Center’s Music Room, is free and open to the public.
Tom Rasmussen is the great-great grandson of Sarah and Frederick Weyerhaeuser and has completed extensive personal research on the Weyerhaeuser family and Judith Healy is the author of the book, Frederick Weyerhaeuser and the American West (2013). Using amazing photographs of bygone days, of forests and villages and family celebrations, Rasmussen and Healy will present the story of these two self-made timbermen both of whom were as much family men as business men.
The history of Frederick Weyerhaeuser is also the history of the settling of the Midwest. A towering figure of the later decades of the 1800s, Frederick Weyerhaeuser made his fortune by founding and growing a timber business that depended on the mighty Mississippi. Although he made his home in Rock Island, his business affected the Iowa side of the border as much as the Illinois side, and all was fed by the timber his men took out of the Wisconsin forests.
In the book, Frederick Weyerhaeuser and the American West, Judith Healey presents Weyerhaeuser as a successful businessman and family man. With only six years of formal schooling himself, Weyerhaeuser sent his children to eastern colleges, and in his later years, became a philanthropist who generously supported projects locally and in his native German village.
Peter Musser was one of Muscatine’s leading citizens. Born in Pennsylvania of Swiss and English parentage, his connection with the Iowa lumber trade began in the early 1870s. Musser was head of a saw mill which produced 40 million feet of lumber annually. He was also a large holder of Minnesota and Wisconsin timber lands and an active logging trader. Throughout the northwest, he was known for his farsighted business judgment.
In his northern ventures, Peter Musser was an associate of Frederick Weyerhaeuser, whose pioneer enterprise in timber tracts along the upper Mississippi and its tributaries made him nationally known as “Lumber King of the Northwest.” Musser and Weyerhaeuser jointly located their two sons – Drew Musser and Charles Weyerhaeuser – in Little Falls, Minnesota to run a lumber operation. The two sons built mansion side-by-side – today, both homes are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Weyerhaeuser mansion is open as the Linden Hill Historic Museum.
The program on November 5th is free and open to the public. Reservations are not required. Please contact Melanie Alexander, Director, with any questions or concerns at 563-263-8282 or by email at malexander@muscatineiowa.gov.
The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. Visit www.muscatineartcenter.org for more information about programs and events and to download a class brochure.

 
          
 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 2015
 
Noon Program: “Linden Hill”, Little Falls, MN: Home of Drew Musser and Charles Weyerhaeuser
Speakers: Karen and Denis Dolan, Volunteers with Linden Hill
In the Music Room at the Muscatine Art Center
Thursday, October 22, 2015 from Noon to 1 p.m.
FREE ADMISSION
 
Built in 1898, the neighboring homes of Charles A. Weyerhaeuser and Richard "Drew" Musser are physical reminders of the "Lumber Era" in Minnesota. Linden Hill volunteers, Karen and Denis Dolan, will present on the homes which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The nine-acre estate, including both homes, was used by the Musser family until 20 years ago, and is now an event center run by the non-profit Friends of Linden Hill. The group host weddings, receptions, teas, retreats, Christmas tours, and other special occasions throughout the year. Visitors can even stay overnight in the bedrooms in the beautiful Musser mansion.
Laura Musser McColm frequently visited her brother Drew and his family at Linden Hill. Her journal describes family gatherings in Minnesota: “Wednesday, January 1, 1936 - A very pleasant day in my brother’s home. Mary & “Lotsie” at home for the holidays. Sarah dear, so kind to me and Drew such a wonderful brother make me feel very much at home and I do love to be with them…. Sarah & Drew had twenty people in the welcome the New Year.  We had a jolly time.”
The Musser family began calling the estate "Linden Hill" in the 1920s, because of the many linden, or basswood, trees on the property. One of the Linden Hill homes - the white Musser Mansion - had been virtually closed off after Drew Musser's death in 1958. When it was reopened decades later, his toothbrush and razor were still in place in the bathroom as if still waiting for Mr. Musser's return. Most of the furniture and furnishings remain intact and undamaged, making it a living example of life for the upper class in the area during the early 20th century.
The program on October 22nd is free and open to the public. Reservations are not required. Please contact Melanie Alexander, Director, with any questions or concerns at 563-263-8282 or by email at malexander@muscatineiowa.gov.
The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. Visit www.muscatineartcenter.org for more information about programs and events and to download a class brochure.  



 


PRESS RELEASE
MUSCATINE ART CENTER
1314 Mulberry Avenue, Muscatine, IA 52761   563­263­8282 www.muscatineartcenter.org
CONTACT: Melanie Alexander, Director 563­263­8282 or malexander@muscatineiowa.gov
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
 
Presentation: “Laura Musser & Her Legacy” by Melanie Alexander The Muscatine Art Center’s Music 
Room
Thursday, September 24th at 5:30 p.m. FREE ADMISSION
Join Muscatine Art Center Director, Melanie Alexander, for an exploration of the life and legacy of 
Laura Musser  McColm Atkins. The presentation, “Laura Musser & Her Legacy”, is offered as part of 
the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Laura Musser Art Gallery & Museum, later named the 
Muscatine Art Center. Photographs of Laura Musser, some rarely on view, will be woven into the free 
presentation offered on September 24th at 5:30 p.m.
 
Details about Laura Musser’s family, her marriage to Edwin McColm, her involvement in the McColm 
Dry Goods Store, and her second marriage to William T. Atkins of Kansas City will be shared. 
Through oral histories given by Laura’s domestic servants, the day­to­day operations of the 
households as well as the individual experiences as a member of Laura’s staff will be highlighted. 
The presentation also includes photographs of clothing belonging to Laura Musser and a discussion 
of the artwork that captured Laura’s likeness during her lifetime.
 
The Muscatine Art Center’s collection includes the locally well­known portrait by Thomas Riss 
painted from a photograph taken by Oscar Grossheim as well as a marble statue bust of Laura as 
child created by sculptor George Grey Barnard and a bronze relief bust of Laura as a young lady.
 
Quotes from Laura Musser’s journals from 1936 and 1937 will illustrate how she spent her days in 
the time period between the passing of her first husband and her second marriage. Laura’s words 
capture the degree to which she took responsibility for the operations of the McColm Dry Goods 
Store/Laurel Building, her fondness for her family (and especially her close connection to her 
brother Drew who lived in Little Falls, Minnesota), and her compassion for many individuals and 
families in Muscatine.
 
Director Melanie Alexander’s talk is the first in a series of programs about the Musser family and 
their connections. On October 22, 2015 at noon, volunteers from Linden Hill, the home of Laura’s 
brother Drew, will present on Drew Musser, his family, and his connection to his next door 
neighbor, Charles Weyerhaeuser. Charles and Drew both built mansion which are today listed on the 
National Register of Historic Places – the Weyerhaeuser mansion is open as the Linden Hill Historic 
Museum. Peter Musser and Frederick Weyerhaeuser, fathers of the Drew and Charles, had been business 
partners and friends back in the Muscatine/Quad Cities area. On November 5, 2015 at 5:30 p.m., 
historian Tom Rasmussen and author Judith Healy will present on the important relationship between 
Peter Musser and Frederick Weyerhaeuser.
 
All programs are free and open to the public. Reservations are not required.
 
Please contact Melanie Alexander, Director, with any questions or concerns at 563­263­8282 or by 
email at malexander@muscatineiowa.gov.
 
The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday 
through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and 
Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. Visit www.muscatineartcenter.org for more information 
about programs
and events and to download a class brochure.
 



Exhibit: Cylinder & Disc Music Boxes
Exhibit dates:  January 22 through March 22, 2015
Program: Cylinder & Disc Music Boxes by Brian Walter on Thursday, February 12 at 5:15 p.m.

 

The Laura Musser Mansion Small Gallery now features the second in its series of music box exhibits from the private collection of Brian Walter and the Art Center’s permanent collection. This second series highlights the history and chronology of “Cylinder” & “Disc” music boxes from the 1870-1900 era.
 
A “Cylinder & Disc Music Box” program will be presented by Brian Walter, at 5:15 on Thursday, February 12, 2015.
 
The period of 1870 to 1890 was the height of production for cylinder music boxes. The cylinder music box provided live music without performers and the sound it produced was very much like a group of harpists or a hand bell choir. Extensively inlaid cases and multiple cylinders (which included ‘shifting’ and ‘removable’ cylinders) mark this era as the most technically challenging period for cylinder type manufacturing.


The development of the first interchangeable disc music boxes in 1886, made it even easier and less expensive to add tunes. These “Symphonion” boxes were originally made in Leipzig, Germany and were destined to become some of the greatest music boxes ever known. Even this innovative design which accepted individual tune discs (allowing one music box to play multiple tunes), could not save the cylinder music box companies, as many were forced out of business due to increased sales and aggressive marketing of the new disc music boxes.
Other music box makers caught on to the new disc technology and began building their own masterpieces: most notably “Polyphon” in Germany and “Regina” in the United States. By 1900, the “Gramophone” (or record player) had replaced disc music boxes, due to lower price and greater variety of music available. 


EVENT DETAILS:
What: “Cylinder & Disc Music Boxes” Program
Who: Brian Walter
When: Thursday, February 12, 2014
Time: 5:15 PM
Where: The Muscatine Art Center’s Music Room
Admission to this program is FREE.
 
Please contact Melanie Alexander, Director, with any questions or concerns at 563-263-8282 or by email at malexander@muscatineiowa.gov.
 
The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. Visit www.muscatineartcenter.org for more information about programs and events and to download a class brochure. 


 

August 14, 2014

The Muscatine Art Center has received funding from Humanities Iowa, a private, non-profit state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, to host the presentation, “Grass Between the Rails”, by Denny Rehder at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, Muscatine Art Center, 1314 Mulberry Avenue, Muscatine. A cultural resource for Iowans since 1971, Humanities Iowa offers many cultural and historical programs and grants to Iowa’s communities. The performance is free and open to the public.

Denny Rehder created this program as an official Iowa Sesquicentennial event in 1996. His appearances around the state have been funded by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities ever since. This will be his 89th performance.

Rehder has been a musician all his life. He has combined that ability with his love of Iowa history to produce "Grass Between the Rails," a celebration of Iowa's railroad heritage in words and original music. His songs cover the gamut of Iowa railroad history from the race for Council Bluffs to the Burlington Zephyr. Through his music, he visits the worst wreck ever, Iowa’s best-known railroad hero, the road through Paradise, the one elephant circus and his family’s ties to the Illinois Central.

He has been involved in the publication of several books on Iowa history. Four were published by his own Waukon & Mississippi Press, including his first book, "Grass Between the Rails," the history of the Waukon, Iowa, branch of the Milwaukee Road. He also wrote and published “The Shampoo King,” the history of the F. W. Fitch Company and the famous Fitch Bandwagon radio show.

Now retired, he has been a professional writer and photographer for more than fifty years.  His work has received local, regional and national awards. Rehder grew up on a farm near Gladbrook overlooking the Chicago Great Western mainline.
For details, please contact Melanie Alexander, Director, at 563-263-8282.

 


 



May 15, 2014

 Marvin Cone: Quiet Integrity art talk will be given on the third Thursday, May 15, at 5:30 p.m. at Muscatine Art Center. The program will provide information about the life of Marvin Cone, including his long friendship with Grant Wood. The two met in high school, traveled to Paris, attended the Art Institute of Chicago, and joined forces in the summer of 1932 and 1933 to create Stone City Art Colony. As people they were opposites and each followed a different path, but they did influence each other.

 Cone and Wood were both active in the Cedar Rapids Art Association, one of the oldest art organizations in Iowa, which later becomes the Cedar Rapids Art Museum. The program will include the history of the association and many images from the Muscatine Art Center, Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Coe College and Figge Art Museum  The cultural environment of Cedar Rapids provided both Cone and Wood with exposure to well known artists and the inspiration to become artists.

 Marvin Cone lived in Cedar Rapids, married, raised a family, and taught at Coe College. Although, he does not have the fame of Grant Wood, it is clear that he was a skilled artist and an important figure in American painting.

 After graduating from Coe College with liberal arts degree, he attended the Art Institute of Chicago with Grant Wood. Both joined the army during World War I. Because Marvin Cone could speak French, he was selected to attend the University of Montpellier, France, in February of 1919 before returning home. Marvin returned to Cedar Rapids to teach French at Coe College. The following summer Cone and Wood traveled to Paris, London, Liverpool, and Antwerp. Both painted in the Impressionistic style and held an exhibition of their artworks on the ship as they return to Cedar Rapids.

 On the same return trip home, Grant Wood introduced Marvin to Winnifred Swift whom Marvin married in 1921. Winifred and Marvin had one daughter, Doris.

 During the 1920s, Cone's activities included starting the art department at Coe College and keeping an active schedule of exhibitions with the Cedar Rapids Art Association. At the time, Cedar Rapids was a thriving atmosphere for the arts and in 1928, the American Federation of Arts and Carnegie Foundation provided a $50,000 grant to open The Little Gallery, and Edward Rowan was hired as a trained museum administrator. Rowan arranged for Cone and his wife to go back to Paris in 1929. In 1930, Grant Wood, received the Art Institute award for American Gothic and became famous.

 1932, Marvin Cone and Grant Wood taught at the Stone City Colony and Art School. Background information and images of the Stone City Colony are included in the program. Courses at the Stone City Colony were accredited by Coe College. Unfortunately, the Depression caused the Colony to close after two summers. Grant Wood went on to teach at the University of Iowa, while Cone was appointed professor of painting at Coe College.

 The art talk will take you through Marvin Cone’s styles: landscapes, haunting interiors, barns, circus scenes, and finally abstract images. Unlike artists associated with regionalist and American scene painting of the 1930s, Marvin Cone would integrate his firsthand observation and move from realism to abstraction. Cone's work includes more than rural Midwest scenes.

 On May 18, 1965, Marvin Cone died. As a tribute to his forty years of teaching, Coe College established the Marvin Cone Collection and the Marvin Cone Alumni collection with his artwork on display. The Cedar Rapids Museum of Art provided images for the program as the museum has one of the largest collection of Marvin Cone’s works in the United States.

For more information about this topic or to schedule an interview with Carol Ehlers or please call Melanie Alexander, Director of the Muscatine Art Center, at (563) 263-8282 or e-mail malexander@muscatineiowa.gov


American Musical Organettes

The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center for the presentation, “American Musical Organettes: The Early Years of Mechanical Music in the Home”, by Muscatine collector Brian Walter. The 45 minute presentation will explore the use of musical organettes in the home from 1879 to 1920. The presentation is offered in conjunction with a temporary exhibition on Musical Organettes and will take place on Thursday, January 23rd at 5:15 PM in the Muscatine Art Center’s Music Room. Admission is FREE.
 
An organette was a mechanical accordion that was manufactured in the late 1800s by several companies, most notably the Autophone Company of Ithaca, New York. Music was recorded on rolls of perforated paper and turned over a track bar. Air was produced by hand- or foot- operated bellows, which would be pushed through the perforations corresponding to different notes, much like a player piano. Some models of organettes were played by mechanically blowing through them, but most were played with a crank that was turned to create a vacuum.
There were at least six models made – the standard 22-note model, the 32-note Autophone, the Concert model (tabletop with operating handle and cabinet style with floor pedal) and other floor standing models. The Autophone Company manufactured the organette in vast numbers. In 1889, it was noted in Harper’s Magazine that the Autophone Company recorded 18,000 units sold. 
Although these types of machines were sold into the 1930s, they began to lose their popularity by 1900 while the home phonograph rose in popularity. The Rollmonica -- or "player harmonica" -- sold during the late 1920s and the 1930s was the last organette produced.

 

The Laura Musser Mansion Small Gallery currently features the first in a series of music box exhibits from the private collection of Brian Walter. The temporary exhibition and the presentation by Brian Walter are the first in a series on historical music boxes. 

 

Marie Laurencin by Carol Ehlers


The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center in welcoming Carol Ehlers, art history speaker, as she presents a 45 minute lecture on French Cubist painter Marie Laurencin. The lecture will take place Thursday, August 22 at 5:30 pm in the Muscatine Art Center’s Music Room. Admission is free.

Marie Laurencin was born in Paris in 1883 and was an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde scene during the early years of the 20th century. She had close friendships with many fellow Cubists, including Pablo Picasso, George Braque, and Juan Gris and exhibited with them in 1910 and 1911. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire and is often identified as his muse.

When Laurencin divorced from her German-born husband in 1920, she returned to Paris from Germany. There she achieved financial success as an artist until the depression of the 1930’s. During the Depression she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She taught and continued to paint until her death in 1956.

Marie Laurencin is admired first and foremost for her charming sense of color and style which makes her paintings immediately recognizable. Her works, which included oil paintings and pastels, watercolors, drawings, and prints, remained remarkably consistent throughout her career. She is known as one of the few female Cubists and although she worked closely with other members of the movement, she developed a unique approach to the subject of abstraction. Her use of pastels and curved, feminine forms kept her body of work outside the norms of Cubism.

In 1992 the Muscatine Art Center’s collections were significantly enriched by a gift of twenty-seven works of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Degas, Boudin, Chagall, Renoir, and other European artists. The collection was a gift from the estate of Mary Musser Gilmore in honor of her parents, Richard Drew Musser and Sarah Walker Musser. The paintings are on permanent display in the Laura Musser Mansion.

                          

 

The Wonderful World of Color: Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center in welcoming Carol Ehlers, art history speaker, as she presents a 45 minute lecture on the art of French Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and his love of 19th century Parisian life. 

Renoir's paintings are noted for their vibrant light and saturated color. Characteristic of the Impressionist style, Renoir suggested the details of a scene through freely brushed touches of color, so that his figures softly fuse with one another and their surroundings. The warm sensuality of Renoir's style made his paintings some of the most well-known and frequently reproduced works in the history of art. 

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was born February 25, 1841 to a working class family in Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France. As a boy he worked in a porcelain factory, where his drawing talent led to him being chosen to paint designs on fine china. 

In 1862, at the age of 25, he began studying art in Paris, where he met such artists as Alfred Sisley and Claude Monet. Although Renoir first started exhibiting paintings at the Paris Salon in 1864, he often did not have enough money to buy paint.

Renoir did not receive critical acclaim until 1874 when six of his paintings were included in the first independent Impressionist exhibition. One of Renoir’s best known works is his 1876 Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette. The painting depicts an open-air scene, crowded with people, at a popular dance garden on the Butte Montmartre, close to where he lived.

By 1892 Renoir had developed rheumatoid arthritis. In 1907 he moved to warmer climate close to the Mediterranean coast. He painted even when arthritis had severely limited his movement and he was wheelchair-bound. Renoir remained able to grasp a brush, although he required an assistant to place it in his hand. 

In 1919 Renoir visited the Louvre art museum in Paris to see his paintings hanging with those of the old masters he used to study as a boy. He died in the village of Cagnes-sur-Mer, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, on December 3 that same year.

In 1992 the Muscatine Art Center’s collections were significantly enriched by a gift of twenty-seven works of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Degas, Boudin, Chagall, Renoir, and other European artists. The collection was a gift from the estate of Mary Musser Gilmore in honor of her parents, Richard Drew Musser and Sarah Walker Musser. The paintings are on permanent display in the Laura Musser Mansion.
 

EVENT DETAILS:

Lecture: “The Wonderful World of Color: Pierre-Auguste Renoir”
Who: Carol Ehlers 
hen: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 5:30 PM
Where: The Muscatine Art Center’s Music Room

Admission to this program is FREE.

 

 


Iowa Battle Flag Conservation Project


The State Historical Society of Iowa’s current Collections Manager/Flag Conservator and Historian, Sheila Hanke, will be presenting a talk about the Iowa Battle Flag project at the Muscatine Art Center on Sunday, October 9 at 2:00PM in the Music Room. Sheila is responsible for overseeing the stabilization and documentation of individual flags. She oversees policies, procedures and registration relating to the flag collection. Sheila also manages the conservation laboratory and supervises technical staff. She oversees the development of interpretive exhibitions and related publications.

Those in attendance of the talk will be able to view the progress of the historic conservation of Iowa’s military and territorial flags and will learn more about Iowa in the Civil War. For much of the 9 year preservation project, the public has been able to see the conservator at work in the laboratory through tours and video conferencing. The customized laboratory has provided a secure location for these national treasures to be documented, preserved and interpreted. These flags represent not only Iowa’s history but Iowa’s role in a pivotal event in our nation’s history. The preservation effort ensures that future generations will know the stories of the men and women who served this nation. By building a secure conservation laboratory, the State Historical Society of Iowa has provided the public with a unique look into the preservation process while protecting the flag collection.

The talk will be a 45 minute presentation on the history of the grassroots effort to launch the project, the flag collection and the conservation process.

DETAILS:

What: Iowa Battle Flag Conservation Project talk by Sheila Hanke
When: Sunday, October 9, 2011
Time: 2:00PM
Where: The Muscatine Art Center’s Music Room
Admission to this program is FREE.

Please contact Katy Doherty, Program Coordinator, with any questions or concerns at 563-263-8282 or by email at kdoherty@muscatineiowa.gov.

 

The Muscatine Art Center is open to the public Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 10AM to 5PM, Thursday from 10AM to 7PM and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5PM Admission is FREE.



African Americans in the Civil War

Thursday, July 28, 2011 6:00 pm in the Stanely Gallery
Lecture by Jack Lufkin, History Curator for the State Historical Society of Iowa. 
A reception will follow.

An Iowa Soldier Writes Home:
The Civil War Letters of Union Pvt. Daniel J. Parvin 

Thursday, July 28, 3:00 - 5:45 PM, Book Signing
Saturday, July 30, 2:00 - 4:00 PM, Lecture and Book Signing by Phillip Hubbart, Great-great grandson of Daniel J. Parvin and author.

 Artillery in the Civil War

The Civil War is often referred to as the first “modern” war in history as it included the most advanced technology and innovations of warfare available at the time. Some of the innovations and advances of the Civil War included mass production of war material, rifling of gun barrels (including the fatal Minnie Ball), the advent of repeating firearms and metallic cartridges, and the gradual decline of tactics from previous centuries.

In conjunction with the Muscatine Art Center’s exhibit, Muscatine and the Civil War: A Sesquicentennial Commemoration, the Muscatine Art Center will host 1st SGT David Lamb and the “Iowa Rifles” of Company “A” 49th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The “Iowa Rifles” will present a special program on the use of artillery during the Civil War, using their own non-firing pieces. The “Iowa Rifles” consists of four certified Civil War artillerists who will accurately and safely demonstrate the use of the weapons used during the four years of the Civil War.

It is the mission of the “Iowa Rifles” SVR Unit to “further the ideals of the Department of Iowa, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, through the provision of a highly trained and proficient marching unit that shall consist of a Color Guard, and associated other small units to perform at public functions of all sorts at the direction of the Iowa Rifles commanding NCO/Officer.”

Event details:
What: The Iowa Rifles
When: Saturday, July 2, 2011
Where: Muscatine Art Center Music Room
Time: 3:00 to 4:00 PM
This event is FREE and open to the public.

For questions, please contact Katy Doherty, Program Coordinator at (563) 263-8282, or by email at kdoherty@ci.muscatine.ia.us.

The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue, Muscatine. We are open to the public Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 10 AM to 5 PM, Thursday